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A hearth with a Bright fire

October 24, 2020

Nicholas Breeze Wood Talks to Bhola Banstola About his work documenting the shamanic traditions of his homeland Nepal, and about a Shamanic Summit he is organising there in 2020.

Nicholas: You’ve worked incredibly hard for many years, travelling the world, bringing the teachings of your Nepalese shamanic tradition to people. What has been your motivation for doing that?

Bhola: Learning and experiencing has deepened my understanding of the tradition and it has brought me a lot of clarity. It helped me to share with a new community people in the West – who are ‘evolving’ in their view and understanding about the rituals, ceremonies and myths which have been passed on for generations in my culture. In Nepal – with the changes of recent times, such as the need for people to have more material possessions, and with people leaving the place of their birth in order to search for better possibilities in life – there is a general lack of interest in
shamanism shown by the younger generation. They are not really interested very much about the traditional practices and the long lineage traditions of their ancestors.

By carrying the ‘knowing,’ which is deeply embedded in me, and with
the renaissance – or at least a deep interest – in ‘reconnecting the ways
of the ancestors,’ an interest which is arising throughout the whole world at this time, I have been invited to travel to different corners of the world to share my tradition.

The Gifts of the Naga

October 24, 2020

Serpent Spirits and their role within the Shamanic Traditions of Nepal written by Bhola Banstola.

Nagas are a class of long-lived, serpent-like, semi-divine, awakened spiritual beings, highly revered as masters of wisdom by shamans and spiritual
practitioners. They are respected for their healing powers, their
magical skill, and their great courage; but sometimes they are
feared for their violence and quick tempers. Nagas vary in their types
of perception and also vary in their levels of wisdom.


Nagas can transfigure into other forms at will, but mostly they appear nake-like, typically depicted as attractive beings, richly adorned with jewels. They are awe-inspiring, their upper bodies appear human, either male of female, but they have a serpentine tail below their waists.


They are deeply connected to the earth, water and the other realms, and nagas are seen as protectors and the bestowers of abundance, both material and spiritual.

A Female Shamaness, Mata, Invoking her Helping Spirits

Nepali Jhankri-Shaman’s Seven Level Thaan-altar

Nepali Jhankri-Shaman’s Seven Level Thaan-altar

Nagas-Makaras, the givers of rain and fertility

SEWA-SERGYAM

October 24, 2020

SEWA-SERGYAM, a ritual of acknowledgement and offering incense- Khasa-Dhami-Shaman, Jhapa, Nepal

Limbu-Yakthung Phedangba-Shamans in Ceremonial Dance

Explore Nepali Shamanism

Banjhankri- the Forest Shaman Incorporation by Tamang Jhankrini Didi

Shamanism in Nepal with Bhola Banstola.

Seeing, perceiving and understanding the Nature is the work of a shaman

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